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4 REASONS WHY NOT

4 REASONS WHY NOT

By Kenneth Reeves

So ummmm yeah, as ya’ll may or may not know, for the first time in our short history, we ( Hip Hop Book Club ) have decided to use our flex card *insert flex emoji*. If you don’t follow the IG (@hiphopbookclub) , here’s a bit of news you might find interesting,  May 22nd’s book club has been flexed from Tha Carter x Lil Wayne to Lord Willin' x Clipse. Since the public got wind of the flex, it’s been a few murmurs , some good , some bad. I can’t lie , I’ve received a few “I think it’s funny how….” ass text on the situation myself , but before the Wayne Heads jump out the window, give us a few moments to provide context to our decision . If we’re being fully transparent , I’ll admit , looking over the crowd and hearing the resounding "ohhhhhhhsss" after announcing  HHBC 103:Tha Carter was a breathtaking experience ,definitely a top 5 feeling since we started HHBC, but in the following days trashcan emoji clouds soon emerged and here's 4 reason why we chose to scrap Tha Carter:


I. “It just wasn’t deep enough”

So I’ll take my L like a man. I was one of the biggest advocates for us (HHBC) doing Tha Carter and why not be? As an adolescent, I idolized the Hot Boys, y’all know that, it’s well documented. I have also previously recognized Lil Wayne as one of my Top 5 rappers and the greatest mixtape rapper of all time , so to choose Tha Carter was a layup in my mind BUT, it’s something special about this Hip Hop Book Club thing. Since we started this HHBC movement, it’s changed my whole perspective on how I consume music, how I regurgitate what I’ve heard on wax and skillfully talk through it with my peers. Considering how much work we put into creating a HHBC and listening to Tha Carter, I knew off the bat, it just wasn’t deep enough to dedicate a whole book club to.

-Kenny

II. " It missed the mark for me" 

"Carter 1 showed small signs here and there of Wayne establishing his position in rap, but it missed the mark for me. Overall that shit was boring. I see why Gillie Da Kid started writing for him. Carter 2 for life."

 -Sobe


III. “That album will always have my respect, but in time you learn certain things aren't meant to hold a place in your mind and heart” 

"I was a junior at Carter HS when Tha Carter was released. In that time, the album felt perfect. It was someone we'd grown up with stepping into his manhood musically. In retrospect it remains perfect for that time because what I thought I was learning about life and myself was not as useful or impressive as perceived. That album will always have my respect, but in time you learn certain things aren't meant to hold a place in your mind and heart. Like the jawn I was with around then, Tha Carter has antiquated into an afterthought."

-T.Lee


“It severely lacks in lyricism--specifically a story line/story-telling-- and in fresh production’’

"To me, Tha Carter was the obvious choice as the next stop on this Hip Hop Book Club journey. I mean, why not do an influential album from one of the most iconic southern artists of our era, right? But after re-listening, the "dopeness" that embodied the album kind of wore off. It severely lacks in lyricism--specifically a story line/story-telling-- and in fresh production. After several listens and discussions, it made sense to temporarily scrap Tha Carter for episode 103, and substitute something with more 'substance' in its place. 

-A.T
 

There it is, fam, raw and uncut, the thoughts that led to Tha Carter's homicide. Welcome to the stage, Lord Willin'.